Annual Donation to The Melodies Center

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Nick’s Fight Board L-R: Liz Carr, George Sisco, Colleen Williams-Wright, Dr. Lucas (Director of Pediatric Oncology), Angie Silipigno (Child Life Specialist, Melodies Center), Janine & Lucas Cammarata, Jonathan Isaksen, Annette Romano. Not in photo: Karen & Mark Patchell, Ann Frantti, Angela Chieco & Susan Sukols

A heart full of love and time spent helping others is a good day. When we come together to share the fruit of our board and community’s hard work that is a fantastic day.

On Thursday, December 14, Nick’s Fight to be Healed Foundation donated $25,000 to the Child Life Specialist position at The Melodies Center at The Bernard & Millie Duker Children’s Hospital at Albany Medical Center. In addition, we donated $15,000 toward technology needs in the new teen technology room that is currently being built in the pediatric oncology clinic.

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Lucas Cammarata, Angie Silipigno (Child Life Specialist), & Janine Cammarata

Lucas and I, as well as Annette, have seen first-hand how important and vital the child life specialist is to the children and teens being treated for cancer. They balance the medical and emotional needs of each patient. Angie is the only child life specialist in the clinic. There are more on the in-patient floor, but Angie meets every single patient as they are diagnosed. That’s 90 new patients a year, but includes all the patients who come for treatment from the previous years and check-ups from the years before that! Approximately 900 children, teens, and young adults are seen at The Melodies Center each year! Angie treats every single one of them as if they were her own. She feels their pain, revels in their successes, and holds them all in her heart. She is a major reason why we work hard all year to raise money.

Nick’s Round Table has raised money for the Teen Tech Room, and it is another huge need that we can’t wait to have filled. Teens and young adults with cancer are often in a transitional part of their life. Some are going through puberty, some are starting college, some are starting careers or life with a partner/spouse, but suddenly they are thrust into a world where they aren’t sure where they fit in. A teen/young adult’s life has not only been disrupted, but displaced.

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Nick’s Round Table L-R: Becca Abel, Angie Silipigno (Child Life Specialist), Katie Kelly, Sarah Olsen, Brittney Decker, Grace & Claire Isaksen, Rob Saba (Dir. of Development, Grateful Patients and Families at AMC)

Having this teen/young adult haven will give this specific age group a space to decompress and connect to their life outside of cancer. It can be a space where they can bond with others in their situation and hopefully feel the support we have for them and every other child diagnosed.

It was a busy year for us with families in need. Over $25,000 granted in financial assistance, $2,400 in gift cards for patients and families, $9,000 for Family Hope Bags, $2,000 in Nick’s Comfort Bags. This doesn’t include holiday support, magazines, DVDs, video games, arts & crafts, and anything else that comes to our attention. The time and effort that our board and volunteers put into making this all come together cannot even be counted. Board member Karen Patchell visits the clinic once and sometimes twice a week with Chloe our therapy dog and also to do yoga. The children absolutely love her!

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Amelia & Bella love yoga!

I couldn’t be prouder and more thankful for everyone who makes up our foundation. It’s important to sit back and absorb our accomplishments this year and since the beginning. Nick Cammarata and Luke Romano are surely proud of all we have done in their names.

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Thank you to everyone, and we look forward to continuing our mission in 2018.

We are There for You

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Know we are here for you.

The uncertainty of cancer can often be the largest stressor when your child is diagnosed. Not knowing if the treatment is working, how you will get time off from work, what the prolonged separations will do to your other children or your family unit, or where the money will come from to pay the growing bills.

Within a month of Nick being diagnosed, my friend Jen at the library said that Gina from the Catie Hoch Foundation wanted to give us gas and food gift cards. I was floored that someone would want to help a total stranger in such a basic way. We were OK, and I didn’t think I should take it when others probably needed it more.

Gina came to the library and gave me the cards. I learned something that day. Sometimes people know what you need more than you do. I accepted them, thanked her, and knew she was there if we needed anything else.

I used the cards when the daily trips to the hospital and doctors took their toll. It helped us financially, but it did more than that. Her outreach gave us that sense of community, of being cared for, of being seen, and comforted.

I never thought I would be in the same place that Gina was with her foundation. Yet here we are. I have always remembered that sense of camaraderie I felt from someone who had been on the same road as me. One of the first services Nick’s Fight to be Healed provided was financial assistance to families. Just in the last month we have supported families with gift cards for food and travel. We have paid to keep the heat on and for mortgages.

These are essentials that everyone needs to remain healthy, safe, and secure. Providing these services reduce stress, but these acts do so much more. When we send a gift card with a handwritten note, we really mean it when we say we are here for you. In addition to assisting with the financial details, we are a shoulder to cry on, an ear to listen, arms to wrap around you when the journey feels impossible. We are kindred spirits who have been where you have been. And even if we haven’t, as people fueled by love, we open our arms to you.

It takes more than medicine and stress reducers to get a family through a cancer diagnosis and back on the road to life. It takes people who will dig deep no matter how painful to show our families that they matter, they are cared for, loved, and valued. That they are human beings going through one of the hardest times in their lives and sometimes just need a simple hug. Or a tap dance and kiss from Chloe, our pet therapy dog.

I am so very proud of what our foundation does, as well as what the other foundations do to give back and raise up our beautiful families. Today I send out a big hug to everyone who needs it and an even bigger thank you to the selfless volunteers and staff who give their hearts, because they simply couldn’t do it any other way.

Healing Kids by Having Fun

Have you ever met a child who didn’t want to have fun?  It’s a known fact that kids like to run around, play games, wrestle, dress up, and be with other kids having a good time.  But what if those kids are young adults and you are a 5-year-old with cancer?

That was the scene yesterday at The Melodies Center’s clinic at Albany Med.  Five young adults, Emily, Alyssia, Brandon, Sarah, and Becca from Nick’s Round Table visited children while they waited for their blood work or to get treatment.  Sweet Chloe, only three years old was very shy, but soon sidled up next to Emily, who helped her color some wooden dolls and decorate them with glitter and jewels.  Sarah and Becca met Piper who they had given a comfort bag to and they gave her a craft to do when she felt like it.  Brandon played some video games with a boy, which is a fantastic distraction. 

Then there was Joshua.  He flew into the clinic playroom like a boy on a mission.  He’s five years old and usually plays video games when he arrives, his mom said. But this time he saw five big kids sitting around a table with various arts and crafts.  Joshua picked a model car and Alyssia quickly set him up.  Joshua painted the car a brilliant blue, mixed with some yellow.  Then he made a necklace. When the nurse called him to get his vitals, Joshua sprinted out of the room and rushed back when he was done. He was having fun with these kids and didn’t want to miss a minute.

Healing Kids by Having Fun.  This concept is not an advanced medical breakthrough or a new chemo drug that will attack a specific cancer.  It’s basic human interaction. It’s about giving these children  something to look forward to–a distraction from the poking and prodding that has taken over their lives.  When you are having fun, you aren’t thinking about cancer and how it has changed your life.

It also opened the young adults’ eyes.  Each one there lost a close friend to cancer. They have experienced the pain and grief.  Now they see how bringing some fun and laughter to a child can help them heal or get them through a particularly difficult day.  It makes a difference and I’m amazed that they put themselves out there every day.

Sometimes it takes a miracle to save a child’s life.  Sometimes it’s laughter with just the right amount of fun.

Special shout out to Zach! It was wonderful seeing you and your mom and to Parker and his mom from Saratoga who I had the pleasure of meeting yesterday. 

Keep Fighting and may laughter and fun get you through each day.